The Impact of Medical Tourism on Cervical Cancer Screening Among Immigrant Women in the United States | BMC Women’s Health

0


  • 1.

    Juon HS, Seo YJ, Kim MT. Screening for breast and cervical cancer in older Korean American women. Eur J Oncol Nurses. 2000; 6: 228-35.

    Google Scholar

  • 2.

    Lebrun LA. Effects of length of stay and language proficiency on health care experiences among immigrants to Canada and the United States. Soc Sci Med. 2012; 74: 1062–72.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 3.

    McDonald JT, Neily J. Race, Immigration Status and Cancer in Women in the United States. J Immigr Minor Health. 2011; 13: 27-35.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 4.

    Miranda PY, Yao N, Snipes SA, BeLue R, Lengerich E, Hillemeier MM. Citizenship, length of stay and screening for breast, cervical and colorectal cancer in women, 2000-2010. Control of the causes of cancer. 2017; 28: 589–98.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 5.

    Shoemaker ML, White MC. Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Among Asian Subgroups in the United States: Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, 2008, 2010 and 2013. Cancer Causes Control. 2016; 27: 825-9.

    PubMed
    PubMed Central

    Google Scholar

  • 6.

    Tsui J, Saraiya M, Thompson T, Dey A, Richardson L. Screening for cervical cancer in foreign-born women by place of birth and duration in the United States. J Women’s health. 2007; 16: 1447-57.

    Google Scholar

  • seven.

    Carrasquillo O, Pati S. The role of health insurance on Pap test and mammography use by immigrants living in the United States. Med. prev. 2004; 39: 943–50.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 8.

    Cofie LE, Hirth JM, Wong R. Chronic comorbidities and cervical cancer screening and adherence in US-born and foreign-born women. Control of the causes of cancer. 2018; 29: 1105-13.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 9.

    Son J. Assimilation and use of Korean immigrant women’s health services. Qual Health Res. 2013; 23 (11): 1528–40.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • ten.

    Jang SH. Medical Transnationalism: Korean Immigrant Medical Tourism in South Korea. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield; 2018.

    Google Scholar

  • 11.

    Connell J. Medical Tourism. Wallingford: Cabi; 2011.

    Google Scholar

  • 12.

    Connell J. Contemporary medical tourism: conceptualization, culture and commodification. Manag Tower. 2013; 34: 1-3.

    Google Scholar

  • 13.

    Borrayo EA, Jenkins SR. Feeling Frugal: Socio-Economic Status, Acculturation, and Cultural Health Beliefs Among Women of Mexican Origin. Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2003; 9: 197-206.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 14.

    Jacobs EA, Karavolos K, Rathouz PJ, Ferris TG, Powell LH. Limited proficiency in English and screening for breast and cervical cancer in a multiethnic population. Am J Public Health. 2005; 95: 1410-6.

    PubMed
    PubMed Central

    Google Scholar

  • 15.

    Pourat N, Kagawa-Singer M, Breen N, Sripipatana A. Access versus acculturation: identification of modifiable factors to promote cancer screening in Asian American women. Medical care. 2010; 48: 1088–96.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 16.

    Sentell T, Braun KL, Davis J, Davis T. Health literacy and adherence to guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening among Asians and Whites in California. Springerplus. 2015; 19: 432.

    Google Scholar

  • 17.

    Suarez L. Pap test and mammography screening in Mexican-American women: the effects of acculturation. Am J Public Health. 1994; 84: 742-6.

    CASE
    PubMed
    PubMed Central

    Google Scholar

  • 18.

    Hiebert D, Ley D. Transnationalism in Vancouver. In: Satzewich V, Wong L, editors. Transnational Identities and Practices in Canada. Vancouver: UBC Press; 2006. p. 71-90.

    Google Scholar

  • 19.

    Noh S, Kwak MJ, Han JJH. Transnational Interactions Among Korean Immigrants in Toronto: Family Ties and Socioeconomic, Cultural and Political Participation 1. In: Min PG, editor. Koreans in North America: Their Experiences in the 21st Century. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield; 2012. p. 121–34.

    Google Scholar

  • 20.

    Jang SH. The barriers to health care of first generation Korean immigrants and their coping strategies in the United States. Soc Sci Med. 2016; 168: 93-100.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 21.

    Horton S, Cole S. Medical returns: seeking health care in Mexico. Soc Sci Med. 2011; 72 (11): 1846–52.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 22.

    Landeck M, Garza C. Use of Physician Health Care Services in Mexico by Hispanic American Border Residents. Health Mark Q. 2002; 20 (1): 3-16.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 23.

    Ko LK, Taylor VM, Yoon J, Copeland WK, Hwang JH, Lee EJ, Inadomi J. The impact of medical tourism on colorectal screening among Korean Americans: a community cross-sectional study. BMC Cancer. 2016; 16: 931.

    PubMed
    PubMed Central

    Google Scholar

  • 24.

    Lee JY, Kearns RA, Friesen W. Seeking Emotional Health Care: Korean Immigrant Use of the Country’s Health Care Services. Place of Health. 2010; 16 (1): 108–15.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 25.

    Macias EP, Morales LS. Cross the border for health care. J Poor health care Underserved. 2001; 12 (1): 77-87.

    CASE
    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 26.

    Oh K, Jun J, Zhou Q, Kreps G. Korean American Women’s Perceptions of Physical Examinations and Cancer Screening Services Offered in Korea: Influences of Medical Tourism on Korean Americans. J Community health. 2014; 39: 221-9.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 27.

    Thompson WW. Mexican-American Cross-Border Health Care Use and Practices in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. Border Health J. 1993; 9 (2): 1-9.

    Google Scholar

  • 28.

    Wallace SP, Mendez-Luck C, Castañeda X. Going South: Why Mexican Immigrants in California Request Health Services in Mexico. Medical care. 2009; 47 (6): 662.

    PubMed
    PubMed Central

    Google Scholar

  • 29.

    Wang L, Kwak MJ. Immigration, Health Care Barriers, and Transnational Ties: A Case Study of South Korean Immigrants in Toronto. Canada Soc Sci Med. 2015; 133: 340-8.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 30.

    Jang SH, Lee EJ, Lim JA, Vu T, Taylor VM, Ko LK. The role of medical tourism in cancer screening among Korean immigrant women. Health Behav Policy Rev. 2019; 6 (5): 522–33.

    Google Scholar

  • 31.

    Moyer VA. American Preventive Task Force. Cervical Cancer Screening: United States Prevention Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Ann Inter Med. 2012; 156: 880-91.

    Google Scholar

  • 32.

    Institute for Migration Policy. US immigrant population by state and county. [Internet] 2020. [cited June 1 21]. https://www.migrationpolicy.org/programs/data-hub/charts/us-immigrant-population-state-and-county.

  • 33.

    Rong XL, Preissle J. Educating Immigrant Students in the 21st Century: What Educators Need to Know. Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press; 2008.

    Google Scholar

  • 34.

    Yao N, Hillemeier MM. Disparities in mammogram rates among immigrant and native-born women in the United States: progress and challenges. J Immigr Minor Health. 2014; 16: 613-21.

    PubMed
    PubMed Central

    Google Scholar

  • 35.

    Aldrich T, Hackley B. The impact of obesity on gynecologic cancer screening: an integrative review of the literature. J Midwives Wom Heal. 2010; 55 (4): 344–56.

    Google Scholar

  • 36.

    Liu BY, O’Malley J, Mori M, Fagnan LJ, Lieberman D, Morris CD, Buckley DI, Heintzman JD, Carney PA. The association of the type and number of chronic diseases with screening for breast, cervical and colorectal cancer. J Am Conseil Fam Med. 2014; 27 (5): 669–81.

    PubMed
    PubMed Central

    Google Scholar

  • 37.

    Zhao G, Ford ES, Ahluwalia IB, Li C, Mokdad AH. Prevalence and trends in receipt of cancer screens in American women with diagnosed diabetes. J Gen Intern Med. 2009; 24 (2): 270-5.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 38.

    Luque JS, Tarasenko YN, Li H, Davila CB, Knight RN, Alcantar RE. Use of cervical cancer screening among Hispanic immigrant women from the coast of South Carolina. J Racial ethnic health. 2018; 5 (3): 588–97.

    Google Scholar

  • 39.

    Bodenheimer T, Wagner EH, Grumbach K. Improving primary care for patients with chronic disease. JAMA. 2002; 288 (14): 1775–9.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 40.

    Hiatt RA, Pasick RJ, Stewart S, Bloom J, Davis P, Gardiner P, Johnston M, Luce J, Schorr K, Brunner W, Stroud F. Community cancer screening for underserved women: basic design and results Breast and Cervical Cancer Intervention Study. Med. prev. 2001; 33: 190-203.

    CASE
    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 41.

    Ramirez AG, Suarez L, Laufman L, Barroso C, Chalela P. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of screening Hispanic women for breast and cervical cancer. Am J Health Promotion. 2000; 14: 292-300.

    CASE
    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 42.

    Montealegre JR, Mullen PD, Jibaja-Weiss ML, Mendez MMV, Scheurer ME. Feasibility of cervical cancer screening using a human papillomavirus autosampling test among Mexican immigrant women in Harris County, Texas: A pilot study. J Immigr Minor Health. 2015; 17: 704-12.

    PubMed

    Google Scholar

  • 43.

    Sewali B, Okuyemi KS, Askhir A, Belinson J, Vogel RI, Joseph A, Ghebre RG. Screening for cervical cancer with clinical Pap test versus home HPV testing among Somali immigrant women in Minnesota: a pilot randomized controlled trial. Cancer Med. 2015; 4: 620-31.

    PubMed
    PubMed Central

    Google Scholar


  • Share.

    Comments are closed.