Nebraska Medical Center studies children’s Alzheimer’s disease

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More than 6 million Americans live with Alzheimer’s disease. By 2050, this number is expected to double. A groundbreaking study by the UNMC is trying to find a way to reduce that number. The project is called PRANK: Polygenetic Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease In Nebraska Kids. Researchers hope that studying children today will help predict Alzheimer’s disease in the future. “I’m really into science. That’s why I wanted to do it,” said 10-year-old Annika Wolf. Wolf doesn’t always agree with the machine testing it. “Sometimes it’s really hard to memorize all the pictures and figure out which one it was,” she said. But Wolf does it so well, it’s hard to believe she’s part of an Alzheimer’s study. Scientists at the University of Nebraska Medical Center are pulling the research out of the geriatrics ward and moving it to elementary school. “We want to think of disease as a lifelong process, it’s a collection of aggregations of vulnerabilities throughout life, including genetic vulnerabilities that are predefined at our birth,” said David Warren, Ph. .D. with UNMC Neurological Science. With funding from the National Institute on Aging, the small team is working out of the Neuroscience Lab to try to find the elusive markers of Alzheimer’s disease. “And then we are able to look at these different memory tests and then correlate them with MRI and various developmental parameters of Alzheimer’s disease,” said Lillian Behm, clinical research associate at UNMC. Other researchers are compiling that physical evidence. They’re looking at MRI scans like Wolf’s. “That way, if they’re at high or low risk for Alzheimer’s disease, we try to see if it’s related to how their brain works. rv,” said Connor Phipps, a UNMC graduate researcher. Today, no one knows if Wolf could have the disease later. But she has a family history. “My grandmother had it,” Wolf said. “She couldn’t remember a lot of things that happened, like she couldn’t remember who I was and we had to tell her who we were all the time.” Wolf knows that she does serious science and that science is an extension of existing publications. “But this literature is really about adults and seeing these findings in children is really interesting,” said UNMC graduate researcher Meghan Ramirez. this could create vulnerabilities to Alzheimer’s disease much later in life. “The hope is to improve the lives of the millions of Americans who will one day develop Alzheimer’s disease.” What I’d like to see is just improve it on all levels in terms of treatment, in terms of therapy and in terms of early detection,” Warren said. Wolf totally agrees. “I think it’s important because you can know if something is wrong or if something can happen to you,” she said. Click here to learn more about the program or click here to register.

More than 6 million Americans live with Alzheimer’s disease. By 2050, this number is expected to double. A groundbreaking study by the UNMC is trying to find a way to reduce that number.

The project is called PRANK: Polygenetic Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease In Nebraska Kids. Researchers hope that studying children today will help predict Alzheimer’s disease in the future.

“I’m really into science. That’s why I wanted to do it,” said 10-year-old Annika Wolf.

Wolf doesn’t always agree with the machine testing it.

“Sometimes it’s really hard to memorize all the photos and know which one it was,” she said.

But Wolf is doing so well, it’s hard to believe she’s part of a groundbreaking Alzheimer’s study. Scientists at the University of Nebraska Medical Center are pulling research out of the geriatrics ward and transferring it to elementary school.

“We want to think of disease as a lifelong process, that is, a set of vulnerabilities throughout life, including genetic vulnerabilities predefined at our birth,” said David Warren, Ph. D. with UNMC Neurological Science.

With funding from the National Institute on Aging, the small team is working out of the Neuroscience Lab to try to find the elusive markers of Alzheimer’s disease.

“And then we’re able to look at these different memory tests and then correlate them with MRI and various developmental parameters of Alzheimer’s disease,” said Lillian Behm, clinical research associate at UNMC. .

Other researchers compile this physical evidence. They study MRIs like Wolf’s.

“That way, if they’re at high or low risk for Alzheimer’s disease, we try to see if it’s related to their brain function,” said UNMC graduate researcher Connor Phipps.

Today, no one knows if Wolf could have the disease later. But she has a family history.

“My grandmother had it,” Wolf said. “She couldn’t remember a lot of things that happened, like she couldn’t remember who I was and we had to tell her who we were all the time.”

Wolf knows she is doing serious science and that the science is an extension of existing published work.

“But this literature is really about adults, and seeing these findings in children is really interesting,” said UNMC graduate researcher Meghan Ramirez.

Warren said they were looking at “if there are any differences in brain or behavior even very early in life that could create vulnerabilities to Alzheimer’s disease much later in life.”

The hope is to improve the lives of the millions of Americans who will one day develop Alzheimer’s disease.

“What I would like to see is just improve it on all levels in terms of treatment, therapy and early detection,” Warren said.

Wolf is totally on board.

“I think it’s important because you can tell if something is wrong or if something can happen to you,” she said.

Click here to learn more about the program or click here to register.

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